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Spring Tide


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Van Zoetendaal & The Collection

20 May- 3 September

Exercising his expert eye for the beauties of photography, guest curator Willem van Zoetendaal will introduce us to over 200 photographs from the Collection in their original form: that is, directly printed from the negatives. Many of the photographs in the exhibition are well-known in cropped versions but are now being shown for the first time in their entirety. Van Zoetendaal demonstrates that a great deal of information about the photographer’s vision and approach can lie in precisely those apparently insignificant and casual details that cropping tends to eliminate.

Van Zoetendaal will reveal the continuing relevance of the photographs in the museum collection by complementing them with contemporary photographs. The combination produces unexpected links and parallels between past and present. For example, the fact that photographers – then as now – were attracted by motifs like solitary trees, moonlight or reflections in water.

Participating photographers
From the Collection: Katharina Eleonore Behrend, Paul Citroen, Cobie Douma, Bernard F. Eilers, Wally Elenbaas, Ed van der Elsken, Kees Hana, Esther Kroon, Cas Oorthuys, Frits J. Rotgans, Paul Schuitema, Paul Steenhuizen, Richard Tepe and Piet Zwart.
Contemporary photographers: Céline van Balen, Ruth van Beek, Holger Niehaus, Arjan de Nooy, Diana Scherer, Otto Snoek and Harold Strak.

www.nederlandsfotomuseum.nl/en/exhibition/spring-tide/


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Future Matters Symposium


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9-11-2017

Exploring Our Sustainable Materiality

We live in extreme times, from mass global migration, rapidly changing ecosystems to radical shifts in the world’s superpowers, we are witnessing seismic changes in the way we live, work and survive. Our current systems for managing and tackling these changes seem outdated and unreliable. As designers it is our responsibility to look beyond the conventional and probe, question and explore how we can, should or want to shape the future.

Exploring the notion of ‘Sustainable Materiality’, Het Nieuwe Instituut and the MA Material Futures program at Central Saint Martins have invited design practitioners who not only shape and work with materials, but who are also interested in redefining our current systems of manufacture, consumption and current material culture. With sustainability at the heart of each of our invited guests’ practice, we encourage debate and discourse exploring how we, as designers, should and can address some of the challenges facing the material world.

http://bit.ly/Future-Matters


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Into The Great Wide Open


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Earth Matters


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By Lidewij Edelkoort and Philip Fimmano
‘Earth Matters’ refers to the worldwide development regarding sustainability and respect for earth’s resources. In the worlds of design, science and business, these aspects are of great importance. By using the four themes, ‘Honouring Origins’, ‘Collecting Ingredients’, ‘Reinventing Materials’ and ‘Sustaining Production’, the exhibition ‘EARTH MATTERS’, gives the visitor a better understanding of a sustainable cycle and the importance of material studies. The exhibition shows experiments – from fashion to design – that contribute to a sustainable making process, either on a small or a large scale. All projects encourage people to think about the source of materials and the creation process, not only through innovation, but even more by the re-evaluation of crafts and locally produced products. The exhibition is curated by Lidewij Edelkoort and Philip Fimmano, together with the TextielMuseum.
10 June 2017 till 26 November 2017

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In collaboration with Radboud University Nijmegen.

With this botanical test I investigate how different colors of wavelengths influence the shape, taste and medicinal powers of different plants. Photosynthesis: the process in plants that turns sunlight into chemical energy. It influences the shape, structure and colour of plants and explains why fauna in the tropics is often green and plentiful and turns yellow and sparse when placed in the dark. But what would happen if they are cultivated in the light of a specific colour? Do blue-grown herb leafs look different from orange ones? And will bushes standing in yellow light hold more fruit than those from a violet world? For this project we builded six greenhouses in which different plants are grown. Each greenhouse consists of a different coloured stained window, in order to stimulate the growth of a variety of vegetables, herbs and weeds.

23 June – 30 September

Mediamatic Dijkspark 6,  Amsterdam

 Het werk en onderzoek is mogelijk gemaakt door het steun van het Mondriaanfonds.


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Anne Geene, Arjan de Nooy & Diana Scherer

with introduction by Kees Moeliker, director of the Natuurhistorisch Museum Rotterdam.

          http://www.seelevel.nl/


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