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Into The Great Wide Open


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Earth Matters


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By Lidewij Edelkoort and Philip Fimmano
‘Earth Matters’ refers to the worldwide development regarding sustainability and respect for earth’s resources. In the worlds of design, science and business, these aspects are of great importance. By using the four themes, ‘Honouring Origins’, ‘Collecting Ingredients’, ‘Reinventing Materials’ and ‘Sustaining Production’, the exhibition ‘EARTH MATTERS’, gives the visitor a better understanding of a sustainable cycle and the importance of material studies. The exhibition shows experiments – from fashion to design – that contribute to a sustainable making process, either on a small or a large scale. All projects encourage people to think about the source of materials and the creation process, not only through innovation, but even more by the re-evaluation of crafts and locally produced products. The exhibition is curated by Lidewij Edelkoort and Philip Fimmano, together with the TextielMuseum.
10 June 2017 till 26 November 2017

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In collaboration with Radboud University Nijmegen.

With this botanical test I investigate how different colors of wavelengths influence the shape, taste and medicinal powers of different plants. Photosynthesis: the process in plants that turns sunlight into chemical energy. It influences the shape, structure and colour of plants and explains why fauna in the tropics is often green and plentiful and turns yellow and sparse when placed in the dark. But what would happen if they are cultivated in the light of a specific colour? Do blue-grown herb leafs look different from orange ones? And will bushes standing in yellow light hold more fruit than those from a violet world? For this project we builded six greenhouses in which different plants are grown. Each greenhouse consists of a different coloured stained window, in order to stimulate the growth of a variety of vegetables, herbs and weeds.

23 June – 30 September

Mediamatic Dijkspark 6,  Amsterdam

 Het werk en onderzoek is mogelijk gemaakt door het steun van het Mondriaanfonds.


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Anne Geene, Arjan de Nooy & Diana Scherer

with introduction by Kees Moeliker, director of the Natuurhistorisch Museum Rotterdam.

          http://www.seelevel.nl/


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(Re)inventing Nature


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http://fotodok.org/tentoonstelling/3-maart-tm-23-april-2017-reinventing-nature/

 (Re)Inventing Nature examines the changing relationship between humans, nature and technology, and will be on display in Utrecht from 3 March to 23 April. The exhibition features work by international photographers including Illka Halso (FI), Sjoerd Knibbeler (NL), Drew Nikonowicz (US), Reiner Riedler (AT) and Diana Scherer (NL).

The line between nature and technology is becoming increasingly blurred: vision and hearing can be restored thanks to brain implants; robots keep lonely seniors company; and beloved family pets can be cloned before they die. At the same time, all this technology seems to be distancing us from nature. What if we stopped seeing technology as the cause of our problems and started looking to it for solutions? 

In (Re)Inventing Nature, photographers and image makers explore new relationships with nature. The exhibition also looks at the scientific search for future-proof solutions and alternative ways of experiencing nature such as video games and virtual reality. An increasing part of our life takes place in the virtual world. Screens, simulations and digital versions of reality are everywhere: in our work, leisure and social lives. What impact do these worlds have on our perception of the physical world?

3 March 2017 

FOTODOK, Lange Nieuwstraat 7; Utrecht 

 


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Het Nieuwe Instituut


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Interwoven – Exercises in rootsystem domestication

Diana Scherer works with wheat, and specifically this crop’s fast-growing root system. By growing the wheat on a subterranean template, she can manipulate the root system to create ‘woven’ patterns. The form of the textile-like material she cultivates is dictated by a 3D-printed template. Seed, soil and water are the only necessary ingredients for the process. When the roots have grown into the desired pattern, Scherer harvests the crop. She cuts the wheat down and dries the root structure. The photographs she takes of the resulting textiles are an integral part of her working process, but she also preserves the actual materials.

http://hetnieuweinstituut.nl/en/interwoven

Museumpark 25
3015 CB Rotterdam